Sons of Confederate Veterans Mechanized Cavalry

We are members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, who show an interest in motorcycles

Mechanized Cavalry Heritage Defense                                                 

Favorites from the Confederation

Favorites From the Confederation



Collector's Get them while they are still available!!! Postage Stamps !!!!

The Civil War: 1864

First Day of Issue
July 30, 2014  •  Petersburg, VA; Mobile, AL
Series
Civil War Sesquicentennial

The Civil War (1861-1865), the most wrenching chapter in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. The Postal Service™ continues its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing a souvenir sheet of two stamp designs for 2014.

One stamp depicts the 22nd United States Colored Troops engaged in the June 15-18, 1864, assault on Petersburg, Virginia, at the beginning of the Petersburg Campaign. The other stamp depicts Admiral David G. Farragut’s fleet at the Battle of Mobile Bay (Alabama) on August 5, 1864.

Art director Phil Jordan created the stamps using iconic images of the battles. The Petersburg Campaign stamp is a reproduction of a painting, dated 1892, by J. André Castaigne. The Battle of Mobile Bay stamp is a reproduction of a painting by Julian Oliver Davidson, published ca. 1886 by Louis Prang & Co.

For the background image on the souvenir sheet, Jordan used a photograph of Battery A, 2nd U.S. Colored Artillery (Light), Department of the Cumberland, 1864.

The souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Ulysses S. Grant, Jeremiah Tate, Harrie Webster, and Howell Cobb. It also includes some of the lyrics from the Negro spiritual “O Mary, Don’t You Weep.”

The Petersburg Campaign and the Battle of Mobile Bay stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. These Forever® stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce rate.

Digital Color Postmarks

The Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Digital Color PostmarkThe Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Digital Color Postmark

Black Pictorials

The Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Black PictorialThe Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Black Pictorial

Products

Souvenir Sheet of 12

$5.88
587304

Press Sheet with die cuts

$35.28
587306

Press Sheet without die cuts

$35.28
587308

First Day Covers (Set of 2 Petersburg & Mobile)

$1.86
587316

First Day Cancelled (Full Sheet)

$8.38
587319

Ceremony Program (2 stamps, 2 cancels)

$6.95
587330

Digital Color Postmark First Day Covers (Set of 2, Petersburg & Mobile)

$3.28
587321

Souvenir Sheet of 12 & Digital Color Postmark First Day Covers (Set of 2, Petersburg & Mobile)

$9.95
587310

The Civil War: 1864 Commemorative Folio with sheet of 12

$16.95
587327

Framed Stamps with First Day of Issue Plaque

$39.95
587324

From: "Carl Tommy Miller"
Subject: USPS Stamps available

The Civil War: 1865

First Day of Issue
April 9, 2015  •  Appomattox, VA 24522
Series
Civil War Sesquicentennial
The Civil War (1861-1865), the most wrenching chapter in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. The Postal Service™ concludes its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing a souvenir sheet with two new stamp designs for 2015.
One stamp depicts the Battle of Five Forks, near Petersburg, Virginia, on April 1, 1865. The other stamp depicts Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9.
Art director Phil Jordan selected historic paintings for the stamp designs. The Battle of Five Forks stamp is a reproduction of a painting, circa 1885, by French artist Paul Dominique Philippoteaux. The Appomattox Court House stamp is a reproduction of the 1895 painting “Peace in Union” by Thomas Nast, depicting Robert E. Lee’s surrender.
For the background image on the souvenir sheet, Jordan used a photograph of a number of Federal rifles stacked in the vicinity of Petersburg, Virginia, during the siege.
The 12-stamp souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Union General Joshua L. Chamberlain. It also includes lines parodying the lyrics of Patrick S. Gilmore’s famous Civil War song, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.”
The Battle of Five Forks and the Appomattox Court House stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. These Forever® stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce price.

Brother Keith "Rebel" Nelson regularly sends articles

from the Civil War Trust website. There are many great

articles regrarding the preservation and history of Battlefields

Take time to visit their site


A Video Presentation of the Confederate Powderworks


SouthernTraditions- Jerry Clower


Mr. Confederate Man Music Video


An Eagle Scout project In South Georgia Honoring Confederate soldiers


A Very Nice music Video in memory of

Pvt. J.W. Robinson of the Maury Light Artillery

Maury County, Tennessee and his loving wife Josephine


A Real Son Of a Confederate Veteran Reads the Charge


Confederate Hardtack and Johnny Cakes

During the War milk was a luxury, so soldiers usually made a mush with their cornmeal and pork drippings and cooked it over a fire with a stick, knife, bayonet or whatever else they could find

Hardtack crackers
Some recipes omit shortening

2 cups of flour
1/2 to 3/4 cup water
1 tablespoon of Crisco or vegetable fat
6 pinches of salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Mix the ingredients together into a stiff dough, knead several times, and spread the dough out flat to a thickness of 1/4 inch on a non-greased cookie sheet.

Using a pizza cutter or a knife, cut dough into 3-inch cracker squares. With the flat end of a bamboo skewer, punch four rows of holes, four holes per row, into each cracker.

Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from oven, turn crackers over on the sheet and return to the oven and bake another 30 minutes. Cool completely.

Confederate Johnny cake

2 cups of cornmeal
2/3 cup of milk
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon baking soda
Pinch of salt

Butter
Molasses

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Mix ingredients into a stiff batter and form 8 biscuit-sized "dodgers." Bake on a lightly greased sheet for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.

Or, spoon the batter into hot cooking oil in a frying pan over a low flame. Remove the corn dodgers and let cool on a paper towel, spread with a little butter or molasses.